From Adam to Noah, 1-32

Genesis 5:1 This is the written account of Adam’s line. When God created man, he made him in the likeness of God.

This is the written account of Adam’s line

‘In April 1890, William Henry Green of the Princeton faculty wrote an article in Bibliotheca Sacra pointing to some clear principles used by the writers of Scripture in the construction of genealogies. Those principles include the following:

1. Abridgment is the general rule because the sacred writers did not want to encumber their pages with more names than necessary.

2. Omissions in genealogies are fairly routine. For example, Mt 1:8 omits three names between Joram and Ozias (Uzziah); namely, Ahaziah, (2 Kings 8:25) Joash (2 Kings 12:1) and Amaziah. (2 Kings 14:1) In verse 11, Matthew omits Jehoiakim. (2 Kings 23:34) In fact, in Mt 1:1 the whole of two millennia are summed up in two giant steps: “Jesus Christ, the son of David about 1000 B.C., the son of Abraham about 2000 B.C..”

3. The span of a biblical “generation” is more than our twenty to thirty years. In Syriac it equals eighty years. Often in the Exodus account a generation is 100 to 120 years.

4. The meanings of begat, son of, father of and even bore a son often have special nuances, as the context often indicates. To beget often means no more than “to become the ancestor of.” To be the father of often means being a grandfather or greatgrandfather. The point is that the next key person was descended from that male named “father” in the text.’ (HSB)

Genesis 5:2 He created them male and female and blessed them. And when they were created, he called them “man”.

Genesis 5:3 When Adam had lived 130 years, he had a son in his own likeness, in his own image; and he named him Seth.

Concerning the historicity of Adam, Bruce Ware observes: ‘the language and kinds of descriptors of Adam in Genesis 5:3-5—the number of years he lived after Seth, that he had other children, and the total number of years he lived—are identical to the language and kinds of descriptors used of other historical persons in Genesis and elsewhere (cf., the rest of Gen 5; Gen 11:10-26; Gen 25:7-11; 1 Chron 1-9).’ (SBJT 15.1 (2011): 100-07)

Genesis 5:4 After Seth was born, Adam lived 800 years and had other sons and daughters.

Genesis 5:5 Altogether, Adam lived 930 years, and then he died.

Genesis 5:6 When Seth had lived 105 years, he became the father of Enosh.

Genesis 5:7 And after he became the father of Enosh, Seth lived 807 years and had other sons and daughters.

Genesis 5:8 Altogether, Seth lived 912 years, and then he died.

Genesis 5:9 When Enosh had lived 90 years, he became the father of Kenan.

Genesis 5:10 And after he became the father of Kenan, Enosh lived 815 years and had other sons and daughters.

Genesis 5:11 Altogether, Enosh lived 905 years, and then he died.

Genesis 5:12 When Kenan had lived 70 years, he became the father of Mahalalel.

Genesis 5:13 And after he became the father of Mahalalel, Kenan lived 840 years and had other sons and daughters.

Genesis 5:14 Altogether, Kenan lived 910 years, and then he died. Genesis 5:15 When Mahalalel had lived 65 years, he became the father of Jared.

Genesis 5:16 And after he became the father of Jared, Mahalalel lived 830 years and had other sons and daughters.

Genesis 5:17 Altogether, Mahalalel lived 895 years, and then he died. Genesis 5:18 When Jared had lived 162 years, he became the father of Enoch.

Genesis 5:19 And after he became the father of Enoch, Jared lived 800 years and had other sons and daughters.

Genesis 5:20 Altogether, Jared lived 962 years, and then he died.

Genesis 5:21 When Enoch had lived 65 years, he became the father of Methuselah.

Genesis 5:22 And after he became the father of Methuselah, Enoch walked with God 300 years and had other sons and daughters.

Enoch walked with God – Here is a figure of speech which recalls the intimacy of fellowship between Adam and God in paradise. Enoch had not always so walked: it seems that the birth of Methuselah marked a spiritual turning point for him. God can use the cradle as well as the coffin to awaken a sense of himself and of eternal things.

Enoch’s walk with God was, (a) in the midst of ungodliness, Jude 14-15; (b) voluntarily chosen: it was not that God chose to walk his way, but that he chose to walk God’s way; (c) in the same direction as God: to walk together, there must be agreement. Amos 3:3.

See Heb 11:5

Genesis 5:23 Altogether, Enoch lived 365 years.

Genesis 5:24 Enoch walked with God; then he was no more, because God took him away.

Genesis 5:25 When Methuselah had lived 187 years, he became the father of Lamech.

Genesis 5:26 And after he became the father of Lamech, Methuselah lived 782 years and had other sons and daughters.

Genesis 5:27 Altogether, Methuselah lived 969 years, and then he died.

The patriarchs who lived before the Flood had an average lifespan of about 900 years (Gen. 5). The ages of post-Flood patriarchs dropped rapidly and gradually leveled off (Gen. 11). Some suggest that this is due to major environmental changes brought about by the Flood.

Checking some questionnaires that had just been filled in, a census clerk was amazed to note that one of them contained figures 121 and 125 in the spaces for “Age of Mother, If Living” and “Age of Father, If Living”. “Surely your parents can’t be as old as this?” asked the incredulous clerk. “Well, no,” was the answer, “but they would be, if living.”

Genesis 5:28 When Lamech had lived 182 years, he had a son.

Genesis 5:29 He named him Noah and said, “He will comfort us in the labour and painful toil of our hands caused by the ground the LORD has cursed.”

Genesis 5:30 After Noah was born, Lamech lived 595 years and had other sons and daughters.

Genesis 5:31 Altogether, Lamech lived 777 years, and then he died.

Genesis 5:32 After Noah was 500 years old, he became the father of Shem, Ham and Japheth.